ISD 317 school board appoints Pam Thompson to fill vacancy

Having just taken her oath of office, Pam Thompson, the newly-appointed member of the ISD 317 school board, is seated at the board table on Nov. 18. Also in the picture are, left to right, Superintendent Matt Grose, Director Travis Anttila, Thompson, Business Manager Carol Risberg and Administrative Secretary Tiffany Johnson. Photo by Barbara Cameron
Having just taken her oath of office, Pam Thompson, the newly-appointed member of the ISD 317 school board, is seated at the board table on Nov. 18. Also in the picture are, left to right, Superintendent Matt Grose, Director Travis Anttila, Thompson, Business Manager Carol Risberg and Administrative Secretary Tiffany Johnson. Photo by Barbara Cameron

by Barbara Cameron

The Deer River school board had a varied schedule on Monday evening, Nov. 18. When the meeting began at 6 p.m., there was still a vacant chair at the table; Pam Thompson would fill it 36 minutes later. Between those two points, the board heard an audit presentation and the annual community ed report. Later in the evening, in addition to regular reports, they also learned about the shared work program at the high school and listened to a creative writing student read her poetry.

Chair Brad Box called the room to order with the flag pledge. After approving revisions to the consent and regular agendas, board members listened to their KDV auditor, Jennifer Piekarski, take them through a summary of the district’s FY13 audit for their approval. Along the way everyone learned some of the new terminology in the audit world.

The district received an “unmodified opinion” on their basic financial statements covering governmental activities, each major fund, the aggregate of the non-major funds, cash flows and the comparison of the budget to the actual statement for the general fund.

With the new clarity standards reflected in the audit terminology, “unmodified” is what used to be known as “unqualified.” It is the same clean opinion. The auditor explained that point, assuring the board, “In case you’re hearing some terminology differences, you’re still doing good!”

There was nothing out of the ordinary for the district in the audit communications, either. The segregation of accounting duties and preparation of the financial statements is an internal control finding that most districts receive. Because of financial constraints it’s something not likely to change, but something they simply have to be aware of.

In all matters of legal compliance the district received a clean opinion – “unmodified.” Piekarski told them it was “a very good job.”The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Subscribe Now or Login