Looking Back

Pictured is one of the large hotels in Deer River that provided service for travelers and lumberjacks during the early lumbering days of the area. Built in 1906, it was called the European Hotel. In 1908 the name had been changed to Hotel Everton. The manager, W.A. Everton, was a Deer River pioneer who was one of the first trustees when Deer River became an organized village in 1898. This hotel burned 90 years ago.
Pictured is one of the large hotels in Deer River that provided service for travelers and lumberjacks during the early lumbering days of the area. Built in 1906, it was called the European Hotel. In 1908 the name had been changed to Hotel Everton. The manager, W.A. Everton, was a Deer River pioneer who was one of the first trustees when Deer River became an organized village in 1898. This hotel burned 90 years ago.

Compiled by Joan Isaacs from the files of the Deer River Newspapers.

110 Years Ago—W.L. Wallace of Minneapolis arrives to replace Frank Osgood at the Itasca Lumber Company’s office. Knute Bergum, returned from timber cruise of 10 days in the Big Fork country, was standing on the front platform of the Itasca coach when it jumped the track and ran onto the ice alongside of the trestle at Turtle Lake. No one was hurt.

100 Years Ago—Nels Lone, one of the prosperous settlers across the Mississippi, made proof of his homestead claim at the Cass Lake land office. The first train load of logs to be hauled by the M & R road this season has been dumped at the mill. A new directory for Deer River Telephone Exchange will be gotten out in The News shop next week. The apparatus has arrived for the North Ball Club telephone line.

90 Years Ago—Traveler’s Hotel in Deer River is destroyed by fire. Nothing remains standing but the large brick smokestack. The hotel, also known as the European, was built in 1906. Later it was known as the Everton and also the Rex. On June 1919 John Peterson changed the name to The Travelers. Grandma St. Peter was taken to Itasca Hospital where physicians found her to be suffering from over acidity of the blood.

80 Years Ago—State Division of Game and Fish announces plans for building a bridge over Mud Lake dam. This area is also listed among 20 game refuges or nesting places in Minnesota. Deaths: Nels Lone, one of the first settlers in Wanena community south of Ball Club, came there in 1903. He belonged to a class of real pioneers who transformed the wilderness into communities fit for men and women.

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