Taking part in the local March FoodShare Campaign

Cub Scout Pack 86 member Logan Schumacher was carrying a heavy load of donated food items when he arrived at the Deer River Food Shelf on March 22 to deliver them. Photo by Louise H. McGregor
Cub Scout Pack 86 member Logan Schumacher was carrying a heavy load of donated food items when he arrived at the Deer River Food Shelf on March 22 to deliver them. Photo by Louise H. McGregor

by Louise H. McGregor, staff writer

For more than 30 years, Minnesota FoodShare has coordinated the March Campaign in an effort to help keep the local community food shelves as amply supplied as possible.

Minnesota FoodShare is a campaign that was created by the Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches (GMCC), which had its beginnings in 1905 as the Hennepin County Sunday School Association.

FoodShare is the annual statewide grassroots food and fund drive that provides more than half the food distributed by the 300 Minnesota food shelves throughout the state.

The March Campaign is the only statewide effort where every dollar donated goes directly to food shelves to purchase food for the hungry.

The early roots of GMCC, when it was known as the Hennepin County Sunday School Association, was in religious education, sponsoring workshops for teachers of the city’s Sunday schools. But, as times changed, the group evolved to focus on their core mission: “Uniting people of faith and serving people in need.”

When the name was changed to the Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches in 1951, this organization was already recognized as an early leader in the struggle for human rights and social justice.

Throughout its history, GMCC has provided services to those with severe mental illness, and participated in numerous causes promoting racial equality and efforts to assure fair housing.

As it evolved to become the Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches, this organization has continued to be a changing, resilient and forward-looking faith-based organization that partners with other organizations to help as many people as possible.

For example, in 1974, by helping American Indians in the Twin Cities adjust to urban life by partnering with the Division of Indian Work (DIW). Formed in 1952 as the United Church Committee on Indian Work, DIW is the oldest social service agency serving American Indians in Minneapolis.

And, that is just one example of how GMCC has partnered with other organizations and businesses to help those in need.

Today, through advocacy, action and their family of human service programs, GMCC strives to prevent hunger, provide a positive foundation for youth, maximize the self-reliance of seniors, encourage cultural diversity and pursue the end of poverty. As stated on their website, “We are an organization that brings people, organizations, companies and congregations together for the common good.”

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