Joining forces to achieve wildlife habitat restoration

Joining forces to achieve wildlife habitat restoration
Joining forces to achieve wildlife habitat restoration

Two large prescribed burns were conducted in March in the Mud-Goose Lake Wildlife Management Area (WMA), and in the Boy Bay area of Leech Lake to improve wildlife habitat. Intermixed land ownership is common on the Chippewa National Forest, providing opportunities for joint work. Part of a sustained effort that has existed since 1990, fire treatment of wet meadows involves burning mixed ownership lands that include Forest Service, State, Cass County, Leech Lake Indian Reservation, and private lands. The cooperative burn plan was developed in order to allow this important landscape ecosystem to be managed across boundaries.

Wet meadow ecosystems are fire-dependent communities occurring on the floodplains of streams and lakes. These are non-forested communities, dominated by sedges, grasses, and forbs. These meadows, when in suitable ecological condition, provide potential habitat for breeding waterfowl, as well as some rare bird species. Wet meadows serve as habitat for over 70 vertebrate wildlife species, including waterfowl, songbirds, raptors, shorebirds, small mammals, and fish. These areas are particularly important for breeding populations of ring-necked ducks, which need open meadows for nesting.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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